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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2012, Article ID 930591, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/930591
Review Article

Antenatal Corticosteroids: A Risk Factor for the Development of Chronic Disease

Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto and The Centre for Mother, Infant, and Child Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5

Received 20 November 2011; Revised 30 December 2011; Accepted 31 December 2011

Academic Editor: Simon C. Langley-Evans

Copyright © 2012 Elizabeth Asztalos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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