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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2014, Article ID 478324, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/478324
Research Article

Reliability of a Fully Automated Interpretation of γ-H2AX Foci in Lymphocytes of Moderately Trained Subjects under Resting Conditions

1Sports Medicine and Sports Orthopaedics, University Outpatient Clinic, University of Potsdam, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
2ZIEL-Research Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Munich Technical University, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
3Institute of Health Science, Schwäbisch Gmünd University of Education, 73529 Schwäbisch Gmünd, Germany

Received 9 May 2014; Accepted 16 July 2014; Published 24 July 2014

Academic Editor: Stan Kubow

Copyright © 2014 Juliane Heydenreich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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