Table 2: (a) Human and in vivo example nutrient inducers of selected CYP2 enzymes. (b) Human and in vivo example nutrient inhibitors of selected CYP2 enzymes.
(a)

EnzymeFood, beverage, or bioactive compounds 
Food sources in italics
Type of studyDosages used and references

CYP2AChicory rootIn vivo Diet of 10% dried chicory root [41]

CYP2A6Quercetin 
Apple, apricot, blueberries, yellow onion, kale, alfalfa sprouts, green beans, broccoli, black tea, and chili powder [47, 48]
Clinical500 mg/d quercetin [29]
BroccoliClinical500 g/d broccoli [4]

CYP2B1RosemaryIn vivo Diet of 0.5% rosemary extract [37]
GarlicIn vivo 0.5 and 2.0 mmol/kg diallyl sulfide, or about 75 and 300 mg, respectively [9]

CYP2B2RosemaryIn vivo Diet of 0.5% rosemary extract [37]

CYP2E1Fish oilIn vivo 20.5 g/kg fish oil [36]: note high dose used
Chicory rootIn vivo Diet of 10% dried chicory root [41]

(b)

EnzymeFood, beverage, or bioactive  compounds
Food sources in italics
Type of studyDosages used and references

Ellagic acid 
Berries, pomegranate, grapes, walnuts, and blackcurrants [42]
In vivo 10 and 30 mg/kg/d ellagic acid [43]
CYP2BGreen teaIn vivo 100 mg/kg/d green tea extract [56]
Cruciferous vegetablesIn vivo 3 and 12 mg/kg/d sulforaphane [57]

CYP2B1TurmericIn vivo Diet of 1% turmeric [46]

Green teaIn vivo 45 mL/d/rat (avg. 150 g animal weight) green tea [33]
CYP2CBlack teaIn vivo 54 mL/d/rat (avg. 150 g animal weight) black tea [33]
Ellagic acid 
Berries, pomegranate, grapes, walnuts, and blackcurrants [42]
In vivo 30 mg/kg/d ellagic acid [43]

CYP2C6Ellagic acid 
Berries, pomegranate, grapes, walnuts, and blackcurrants [42]
In vivo 30 mg/kg/d ellagic acid [43]

CYP2C9Resveratrol 
Grapes, wine, peanuts, soy, and itadori tea [32]
Clinical1 g/d resveratrol [28]: note high dose used
Myricetin 
Onions, berries, grapes, and red wine [58]
In vivo 2 and 8 mg/kg myricetin [58]

CYP2C19KaleIn vivo 2 g/kg/d kale, as freeze-dried kale drink [51]

Resveratrol 
Grapes, wine, peanuts, soy, and itadori tea [32]
Clinical 1 g/d resveratrol [28]: note high dose used
CYP2D6Garden cress Clinical7.5 g twice daily intake of garden cress seed powder [55]
KaleIn vivo 2 g/kg/d kale, as freeze-dried kale drink [51]

WatercressClinical50 g watercress homogenate
[59]
Garlic Clinical and in vivo 0.2 mg/kg diallyl sulfide, equivalent to high human garlic consumption [60]  
100 mg/kg garlic oil [52] 
200 mg/kg diallyl sulfide [8] 
30 to 200 mg/kg garlic oil [36] 
Diet of 2% and 5% garlic powder [61]
N-acetyl cysteine 
Allium vegetables [54]
In vivo 25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg N-acetyl cysteine [54]
CYP2E1Ellagic acid 
Berries, pomegranate, grapes, walnuts, and blackcurrants [42]
In vivo 10 and 30 mg/kg/d ellagic acid [43]
Green teaIn vivo 45 mL/d/rat (avg. 150 g animal weight) green tea [33]
Black teaIn vivo 54 mL/d/rat (avg. 150 g animal weight) black tea [33]
Dandelion In vivo 0.5 and 2 g/kg dandelion leaf water extract [62]
Chrysin 
Honey, honeycomb [63]
In vivo 20 and 40 mg/kg/d chrysin [63]
Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) 
Coconut and coconut oil
In vivo 32% calories as MCTs [64]