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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2016, Article ID 1984198, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1984198
Research Article

Exercising in the Fasted State Reduced 24-Hour Energy Intake in Active Male Adults

1University of Scranton, 237 Jefferson Ave., Scranton, PA 18510, USA
2Marywood University, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton, PA 18509, USA

Received 27 May 2016; Accepted 18 August 2016

Academic Editor: Michael B. Zemel

Copyright © 2016 Jessica L. Bachman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The effect of fasting prior to morning exercise on 24-hour energy intake was examined using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants (12 active, white males, years old, :    mL/kg/min) fasted (NoBK) or received breakfast (BK) and then ran for 60 minutes at 60%  . All food was weighed and measured for 24 hours. Measures of blood glucose and hunger were collected at 5 time points. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was measured during exercise. Generalized linear mixed models and paired sample -tests examined differences between the conditions. Total 24-hour (BK:  kJ versus NoBK:  kJ; ) and evening (BK:  kJ versus NoBK: ; ) energy intake and RQ (BK: versus NoBK: ; ) were significantly higher in BK than NoBK. Blood glucose was significantly higher in BK than NoBK before exercise ( versus  mmol/L; ). Hunger was significantly lower for BK than NoBK before exercise, after exercise, and before lunch. Blood glucose and hunger were not associated with energy intake. Fasting before morning exercise decreased 24-hour energy intake and increased fat oxidation during exercise. Completing exercise in the morning in the fasted state may have implications for weight management.