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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2016, Article ID 1984198, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1984198
Research Article

Exercising in the Fasted State Reduced 24-Hour Energy Intake in Active Male Adults

1University of Scranton, 237 Jefferson Ave., Scranton, PA 18510, USA
2Marywood University, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton, PA 18509, USA

Received 27 May 2016; Accepted 18 August 2016

Academic Editor: Michael B. Zemel

Copyright © 2016 Jessica L. Bachman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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