Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2016, Article ID 9104792, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9104792
Research Article

A High Protein Diet Has No Harmful Effects: A One-Year Crossover Study in Resistance-Trained Males

Exercise and Sport Science Laboratory, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, FL, USA

Received 1 July 2016; Accepted 20 September 2016

Academic Editor: Michael B. Zemel

Copyright © 2016 Jose Antonio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. Jackson and O. J. Moore, “The effect of high protein diets on the remaining kidney of rats,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 415–425, 1928. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. A. J. Miller, “The influence of high protein diet on the kidneys,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 42, no. 6, pp. 897–904, 1925. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. R. G. Toedebusch, T. E. Childs, S. R. Hamilton, J. R. Crowley, F. W. Booth, and M. D. Roberts, “Postprandial leucine and insulin responses and toxicological effects of a novel whey protein hydrolysate-based supplement in rats,” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 9, article 24, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. B. Campbell, R. B. Kreider, T. Ziegenfuss et al., “International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: protein and exercise,” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 4, article 8, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. K. D. Tipton, “Efficacy and consequences of very-high-protein diets for athletes and exercisers,” Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, vol. 70, no. 2, pp. 205–214, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. Antonio, A. Ellerbroek, T. Silver et al., “A high protein diet (3.4 g/kg/d) combined with a heavy resistance training program improves body composition in healthy trained men and women—a follow-up investigation,” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 1, article 39, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. Antonio, A. Ellerbroek, T. Silver, L. Vargas, and C. Peacock, “The effects of a high protein diet on indices of health and body composition—a crossover trial in resistance-trained men,” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 13, no. 1, article 3, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. G. M. Turner-McGrievy, M. W. Beets, J. B. Moore, A. T. Kaczynski, D. J. Barr-Anderson, and D. F. Tate, “Comparison of traditional versus mobile app self-monitoring of physical activity and dietary intake among overweight adults participating in an mHealth weight loss program,” Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 513–518, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. Antonio, C. A. Peacock, A. Ellerbroek, B. Fromhoff, and T. Silver, “The effects of consuming a high protein diet (4.4 g/kg/d) on body composition in resistance-trained individuals,” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 11, article 19, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. T. Miller, Ed., NSCA's Guide to Tests and Assessments 1 Edition By National Strength & Conditioning Association (U.S.), Human Kinetics, 2012.
  11. M. K. Toscani, F. M. Mario, S. Radavelli-Bagatini, D. Wiltgen, M. Cristina Matos, and P. M. Spritzer, “Effect of high-protein or normal-protein diet on weight loss, body composition, hormone, and metabolic profile in southern Brazilian women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized study,” Gynecological Endocrinology, vol. 27, no. 11, pp. 925–930, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. D. S. Weigle, P. A. Breen, C. C. Matthys et al., “A high-protein diet induces sustained reductions in appetite, ad libitum caloric intake, and body weight despite compensatory changes in diurnal plasma leptin and ghrelin concentrations,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 41–48, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. K. N. Grooms, M. J. Ommerborn, D. Q. Pham, L. Djoussé, and C. R. Clark, “Dietary fiber intake and cardiometabolic risks among US adults, NHANES 1999–2010,” The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 126, no. 12, pp. 1059.e4–1067.e4, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. D. Lairon, N. Arnault, S. Bertrais et al., “Dietary fiber intake and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in French adults,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 82, no. 6, pp. 1185–1194, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. L. Liu, S. Wang, and J. Liu, “Fiber consumption and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortalities: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies,” Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 139–146, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. T. Kunzmann, H. G. Coleman, W.-Y. Huang, C. M. Kitahara, M. M. Cantwell, and S. I. Berndt, “Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 102, no. 4, pp. 881–890, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. M. L. Fernandez and M. Calle, “Revisiting dietary cholesterol recommendations: does the evidence support a limit of 300 mg/d?” Current Atherosclerosis Reports, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 377–383, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus