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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2017, Article ID 4535710, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4535710
Research Article

Metabolic Differences between Dogs of Different Body Sizes

1Nestlé Purina Research, St. Louis, MO, USA
2The Microsoft Research, University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology (COSBI), Rovereto, Italy
3Metabolon, Inc., Morrisville, NC, USA
4North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC, USA
5Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Rondo P. Middleton; moc.eltsen.dr@notelddim.odnor

Received 13 July 2017; Accepted 25 September 2017; Published 26 October 2017

Academic Editor: Phillip B. Hylemon

Copyright © 2017 Rondo P. Middleton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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