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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2017, Article ID 4823102, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4823102
Research Article

The Effect of Exercise Intensity on Total PYY and GLP-1 in Healthy Females: A Pilot Study

1Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1K 3M4
2Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3C5

Correspondence should be addressed to Tom J. Hazell; ac.ulw@llezaht

Received 12 July 2016; Revised 4 October 2016; Accepted 19 January 2017; Published 13 February 2017

Academic Editor: Maurizio Muscaritoli

Copyright © 2017 Jillian R. Hallworth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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