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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5784759, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5784759
Research Article

Antiglycemic Effect of Water Extractable Arabinoxylan from Wheat Aleurone and Bran

1Department of Food Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2
2Canadian Grain Commission, Winnipeg, MB, R3C 3G8, Canada
3Richardson Centre for Functional Foods & Nutraceuticals, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2

Correspondence should be addressed to Trust Beta; ac.abotinamu@ateb.tsurt

Received 3 February 2017; Revised 12 April 2017; Accepted 26 April 2017; Published 24 May 2017

Academic Editor: C. S. Johnston

Copyright © 2017 Lovemore Nkhata Malunga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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