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Research Letters in Nanotechnology
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 853253, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/853253
Research Letter

Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

1CRO-IRCCS National Cancer Institute, 33081 Aviano, Italy
2Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110, USA
3Research and Development Center, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), 9460 Innovation Drive, Manassas, VA 20110, USA
4Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, School of Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110, USA

Received 23 December 2007; Accepted 10 February 2008

Academic Editor: Federico Rosei

Copyright © 2008 Alessandra Luchini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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