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Journal of Nanotechnology
Volume 2015, Article ID 273859, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/273859
Research Article

Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

1State Key Lab of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266555, China
2Lanzhou Petrochemical Research Institute, CNPC, Lanzhou, Gansu 730060, China

Received 7 May 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Zhongwei Zhu

Copyright © 2015 Zhaoyong Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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