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Journal of Nanotechnology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5175462, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5175462
Research Article

Nanocrystalline Axially Bridged Iron Phthalocyanine Polymeric Conductor: (-Thiocyanato)(phthalocyaninato)iron(III)

1Department of Chemistry, College of Science, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila, Philippines
2Department of Physics, College of Science, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila, Philippines
3Materials Science and Nanotechnology Unit, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila, Philippines

Received 10 June 2016; Revised 12 August 2016; Accepted 21 August 2016

Academic Editor: Carlos R. Cabrera

Copyright © 2016 Eiza Shimizu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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