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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2008, Article ID 626340, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/626340
Research Article

Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

1Third Department of Internal Medicine, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, 55131 Mainz, Germany
2Institute of Pathology, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany
3Department of Urology, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany
4Institute of Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany
5Interdisciplinary Translational Oncological Laboratory (ITOL), Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany
6Unit of Toxicology and Chemotherapy, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
7First Department of Internal Medicine, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, 55131 Mainz, Germany

Received 20 May 2008; Revised 9 September 2008; Accepted 29 September 2008

Academic Editor: Meenhard Herlyn

Copyright © 2008 Thomas C. Wehler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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