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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 627840, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/627840
Research Article

Studies on Multifunctional Effect of All-Trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA) on Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and Its Regulatory Molecules in Human Breast Cancer Cells (MCF-7)

Department of Receptor Biology & Tumor Metastasis, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Kolkata 700 026, India

Received 24 December 2008; Revised 28 February 2009; Accepted 1 May 2009

Academic Editor: Sofia D. Merajver

Copyright © 2009 Anindita Dutta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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