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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010, Article ID 128478, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/128478
Review Article

The Enigma of Tripeptidyl-Peptidase II: Dual Roles in Housekeeping and Stress

1Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara, Italy

Received 30 November 2009; Revised 25 May 2010; Accepted 12 July 2010

Academic Editor: Bruce Baguley

Copyright © 2010 Giulio Preta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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