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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 214186, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/214186
Review Article

Anticancer Drugs from Marine Flora: An Overview

Center of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu, India

Received 30 August 2010; Accepted 29 November 2010

Academic Editor: Dominic Fan

Copyright © 2010 N. Sithranga Boopathy and K. Kathiresan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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