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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 286925, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/286925
Review Article

Disrupting Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization: Insights from Metastasis Suppressor Studies

1Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
2Committee on Cancer Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
3Urology Research, The Departments of Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

Received 5 August 2009; Accepted 6 December 2009

Academic Editor: Maurie M. Markman

Copyright © 2010 Shaheena Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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