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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010, Article ID 835680, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/835680
Review Article

Molecular Mechanisms of Resistance to Tumour Anti-Angiogenic Strategies

Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer UMR 6543, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 06189 Nice, France

Received 16 November 2009; Accepted 5 January 2010

Academic Editor: Arkadiusz Dudek

Copyright © 2010 Renaud Grépin and Gilles Pagès. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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