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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 397195, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/397195
Review Article

Glioblastoma Stem Cells: A Neuropathologist's View

1Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 23 August 2010; Accepted 11 October 2010

Academic Editor: Eric Deutsch

Copyright © 2011 Roger E. McLendon and Jeremy N. Rich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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