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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2011, Article ID 561862, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/561862
Research Article

Molecular Mechanisms of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Proliferation of Lung Cells and Prevention by Vitamin C

Department of Biotechnology and Dr. B. C. Guha Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Calcutta University College of Science, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700019, India

Received 14 December 2010; Revised 12 February 2011; Accepted 24 February 2011

Academic Editor: Aditi Chatterjee

Copyright © 2011 Neekkan Dey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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