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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2011, Article ID 852970, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/852970
Review Article

Novel Perspectives on p53 Function in Neural Stem Cells and Brain Tumors

Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, CCK R8:05, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 2 August 2010; Revised 18 October 2010; Accepted 29 October 2010

Academic Editor: Shih Hwa Chiou

Copyright © 2011 Sanna-Maria Hede et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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