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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2011, Article ID 948786, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/948786
Clinical Study

Familial Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

1Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5
2Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Western Ontario London, ON, Canada N6A 4S2
3Department of Pathology, University of Western Ontario London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5
4Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Centre, Farmington, CT 06107, USA

Received 5 July 2011; Revised 9 August 2011; Accepted 23 August 2011

Academic Editor: J. F. Simpson

Copyright © 2011 Thomas J. McDonald et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Whether or not the familial form of papillary thyroid carcinoma is more aggressive than the sporadic form of the disease remains controversial. Methods. To explore this question and whether or not increased aggressiveness is more apparent in families with multiple affected members, we performed a chi square by trend analysis on our patients clinical and pathologic data comparing: first degree families with three or more affected members versus first degree families with two affected members versus sporadic cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Results. No statistically significant trends were seen for any presenting surgical pathology parameter, age at presentation, length of follow-up or gender distribution. The familial groups exhibited significant trends for higher rates of reoperation ( ) and/or requiring additional radioactive iodine therapy ( ), distant metastases ( ) and deaths ( ). These aggressive features were most apparent in certain families with three or more affected members. Conclusions. Using the chi square by trend analysis, a significant trend was seen for the familial form of papillary thyroid cancer to possess more aggressive features than the sporadic disease. Prompt recognition of the familial nature of the disease may provide earlier diagnosis and treatment in similarly affected family members.