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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 376894, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/376894
Review Article

Current Strategies for Identification of Glioma Stem Cells: Adequate or Unsatisfactory?

Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), 20139 Milan, Italy

Received 3 January 2012; Revised 7 March 2012; Accepted 21 March 2012

Academic Editor: Bruno Vincenzi

Copyright © 2012 Paola Brescia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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