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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 542851, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/542851
Review Article

Lm-LLO-Based Immunotherapies and HPV-Associated Disease

Advaxis, Inc., 305 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA

Received 5 August 2011; Accepted 9 October 2011

Academic Editor: Adhemar Longatto-Filho

Copyright © 2012 Anu Wallecha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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