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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2016, Article ID 9650481, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9650481
Review Article

The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

Center of Cell biology and Cancer Research, Albany Medical College, 47 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, USA

Received 1 September 2015; Revised 5 November 2015; Accepted 16 November 2015

Academic Editor: Kalpesh Jani

Copyright © 2016 Yue Zhao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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