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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2019, Article ID 3516973, 24 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3516973
Research Article

The Pancreatic Cancer-Initiating Cell Marker CD44v6 Affects Transcription, Translation, and Signaling: Consequences for Exosome Composition and Delivery

1Tumor Cell Biology, University Hospital of Surgery, Heidelberg, Germany
2Functional Proteome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany
3Gene Core Unit, EMBL Heidelberg, Germany
4Section of Pancreas Research, University Hospital of Surgery, Heidelberg, Germany
5Department of Pathology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Qingjie Lv; ten.haey@4102eijgniqvl and Margot Zöller; ten.xmg@relleoz.togram

Received 27 March 2019; Revised 20 May 2019; Accepted 9 June 2019; Published 7 August 2019

Guest Editor: Minchan Gil

Copyright © 2019 Hanxue Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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