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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2011, Article ID 615624, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/615624
Research Article

Low Fat Loss Response after Medium-Term Supervised Exercise in Obese Is Associated with Exercise-Induced Increase in Food Reward

1Biopsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
2Sport, Health, and Nutrition, Leeds Trinity University College, Leeds, UK
3Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Received 25 April 2010; Revised 29 June 2010; Accepted 20 August 2010

Academic Editor: Eric Doucet

Copyright © 2011 Graham Finlayson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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