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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2012, Article ID 879151, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/879151
Review Article

Is the Gut Microbiota a New Factor Contributing to Obesity and Its Metabolic Disorders?

1Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Penn State University, 110 Chandlee Laboratory University Park, PA 16802, USA
2Nutrition and Health Department, Nestlé Research Center, Route du Jorat 57, Lausanne 26, CH-1000, Switzerland

Received 28 July 2011; Revised 3 October 2011; Accepted 4 October 2011

Academic Editor: Zoltan Pataky

Copyright © 2012 Kristina Harris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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