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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2014, Article ID 203474, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/203474
Review Article

Early Life Exposure to Fructose and Offspring Phenotype: Implications for Long Term Metabolic Homeostasis

1The Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, HSC 4H30A, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
2The Liggins Institute and Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand

Received 11 October 2013; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 23 April 2014

Academic Editor: Kieron Rooney

Copyright © 2014 Deborah M. Sloboda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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