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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 810374, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/810374
Research Article

Emphasising Personal Investment Effects Weight Loss and Hedonic Thoughts about Food after Obesity Surgery

Psychology Department, FAHS, University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

Received 12 March 2014; Revised 14 May 2014; Accepted 14 May 2014; Published 2 June 2014

Academic Editor: Mark A. Pereira

Copyright © 2014 Margaret Husted and Jane Ogden. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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