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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 983495, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/983495
Review Article

The Weight-Inclusive versus Weight-Normative Approach to Health: Evaluating the Evidence for Prioritizing Well-Being over Weight Loss

1Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2Department of Psychology, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458, USA
3Psychology Private Practice, Los Altos, CA 94022, USA
4Directorate of Health, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland
5Acoria—A Weigh Out Eating Disorder Treatment, Cincinnati, OH 45208, USA
6Department of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NP, UK

Received 16 January 2014; Revised 31 May 2014; Accepted 25 June 2014; Published 23 July 2014

Academic Editor: Robyn Sysko

Copyright © 2014 Tracy L. Tylka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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