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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7353642, 27 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7353642
Review Article

Role of Gut Microbiota in the Aetiology of Obesity: Proposed Mechanisms and Review of the Literature

1Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Khyber Medical University, Phase V Hayatabad, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan
2Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Level 3, New Lister Building, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 10-16 Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK
3Department of Endocrinology, Royal Hospital for Children, 1345 Govan Rd, Govan, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK

Received 1 February 2016; Revised 21 May 2016; Accepted 21 August 2016

Academic Editor: R. Prager

Copyright © 2016 Muhammad Jaffar Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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