Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Obesity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8967092, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8967092
Research Article

Let’s Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

1Health Promotion, Department of Exercise Science and Community Health, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514, USA
2Gramercy Research Group, 7990 N. Point Boulevard, Suite 108, Winston-Salem, NC 27106, USA
3Physical Education, Department of Exercise Science and Community Health, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514, USA
4Department of Exercise Science and Community Health, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514, USA

Received 26 February 2016; Revised 3 May 2016; Accepted 9 May 2016

Academic Editor: Chris Rissel

Copyright © 2016 Debra M. Vinci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant () and focus group () interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities () informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children.