Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Obesity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1048973, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1048973
Research Article

The Effects of Food Labelling on Postexercise Energy Intake in Sedentary Women

1Behavioural and Metabolic Research Unit, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to Éric Doucet; ac.awattou@tecuod.cire

Received 11 January 2017; Accepted 18 April 2017; Published 25 May 2017

Academic Editor: Chris I. Ardern

Copyright © 2017 Jacynthe Lafrenière et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. N. A. King, P. Caudwell, M. Hopkins et al., “Metabolic and behavioral compensatory responses to exercise interventions: barriers to weight loss,” Obesity, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 1373–1383, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. J. Mayer, P. Roy, and K. P. Mitra, “Relation between caloric intake, body weight, and physical work: studies in an industrial male population in West Bengal,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 169–175, 1956. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. M. Pomerleau, P. Imbeault, T. Parker, and E. Doucet, “The Effects of exercise intensity on food intake and appetite in women,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 1230–1236, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. R. J. Stubbs, A. Sepp, D. A. Hughes et al., “The effect of graded levels of exercise on energy intake and balance in free-living women,” International Journal of Obesity, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 866–869, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. E. Jokisch, A. Coletta, and H. A. Raynor, “Acute energy compensation and macronutrient intake following exercise in active and inactive males who are normal weight,” Appetite, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 722–729, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. J. A. King, L. K. Wasse, and D. J. Stensel, “Acute exercise increases feeding latency in healthy normal weight young males but does not alter energy intake,” Appetite, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 45–51, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. M. E. Oakes and C. S. Slotterback, “Judgements of food healthfulness: food name stereotypes in adults over age 25,” Appetite, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 1–8, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. D. J. Shide and B. J. Rolls, “Information about the fat content of preloads influences energy intake in healthy women,” Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 95, no. 9, pp. 993–998, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. M. E. Oakes, “Beauty or beast: does stereotypical thinking about foods contribute to overeating?” Food Quality and Preference, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 447–454, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. E. Oakes and C. S. Slotterback, “Too good to be true: dose insensitivity and stereotypical thinking of foods' capacity to promote weight gain,” Food Quality and Preference, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 675–681, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. P. Chandon and B. Wansink, “The biasing health halos of fast-food restaurant health claims: lower calorie estimates and higher side-dish consumption intentions,” Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 301–314, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. V. Provencher, J. Polivy, and C. P. Herman, “Perceived healthiness of food. If it's healthy you can eat more!,” Appetite, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 340–344, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. J. M. Brunstrom, N. G. Shakeshaft, and E. Alexander, “Familiarity changes expectations about fullness,” Appetite, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 587–590, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. S. M. Willbond, M. A. Laviolette, K. Duval, and É. Doucet, “Normal weight men and women overestimate exercise energy expenditure,” The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 377–384, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. M. Spence, M. Livingstone, L. E. Hollywood et al., “A qualitative study of psychological, social and behavioral barriers to appropriate food portion size control,” International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. 1 article 92, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. J. M. Jakicic, “The role of physical activity in prevention and treatment of body weight gain in adults,” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 132, no. 12, pp. 3826S–3829S, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  17. S. J. Long, K. Hart, and L. M. Morgan, “The ability of habitual exercise to influence appetite and food intake in response to high- and low-energy preloads in man,” The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 517–523, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. C. Martins, H. Truby, and L. M. Morgan, “Short-term appetite control in response to a 6-week exercise programme in sedentary volunteers,” The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 98, no. 4, pp. 834–842, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. G. Cowburn and L. Stockley, “Consumer understanding and use of nutrition labelling: a systematic review,” Public Health Nutrition, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 21–28, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. E. Oakes, “Differences in judgments of food healthfulness by young and elderly women,” Food Quality and Preference, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 227–236, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. S. Tremblay, D. E. R. Warburton, I. Janssen et al., “New Canadian physical activity guidelines,” Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 36–46, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. A. M. Gorczyca, L. A. Sjaarda, E. M. Mitchell et al., “Changes in macronutrient, micronutrient, and food group intakes throughout the menstrual cycle in healthy, premenopausal women,” European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 1181–1188, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. J. McNeil, J. D. Cameron, G. Finlayson, J. E. Blundell, and É. Doucet, “Greater overall olfactory performance, explicit wanting for high fat foods and lipid intake during the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, vol. 112-113, pp. 84–89, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. P. Swain, B. C. Leutholtz, M. E. King, L. A. Haas, and J. David Branch, “Relationship between % heart rate reserve and % VO2 reserve in treadmill exercise,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 318–321, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. American College of Sport Medicine, ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing & Prescriptions, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, Pa, USA, 7th edition, 2005.
  26. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Professional Fitness & Lifestyle Consultant Resource Manual, Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Ottawa, Canada, 1996.
  27. G. A. V. Borg, “Psychophysical bases of perceived exertion,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 377–381, 1982. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. M. J. Chen, X. Fan, and S. T. Moe, “Criterion-related validity of the Borg ratings of perceived exertion scale in healthy individuals: a meta-analysis,” Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 20, no. 11, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  29. A. J. Stunkard and S. Messick, “The three-factor eating questionnaire to measure dietary restraint, disinhibition and hunger,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 71–83, 1985. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. J. McNeil, M.-È. Riou, S. Razmjou, S. Cadieux, and É. Doucet, “Reproducibility of a food menu to measure energy and macronutrient intakes in a laboratory and under real-life conditions,” The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 108, no. 7, pp. 1316–1324, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. J. Achten and A. E. Jeukendrup, “Heart rate monitoring: applications and limitations,” Sports Medicine, vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 517–538, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. B. R. Londeree and S. A. Ames, “Trend analysis of the % VO2 max-HR regression,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 123–125, 1976. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. P. I. Mansell and I. A. Macdonald, “Reappraisal of the Weir equation for calculation of metabolic rate,” The American Journal of Physiology, vol. 258, no. 6 part 2, pp. R1347–R1354, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. J. B. Weir, “New methods for calculating metabolic rate with special reference to protein metabolism,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 109, no. 1-2, pp. 1–9, 1949. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. C. A. Roberto, P. D. Larsen, H. Agnew, J. Baik, and K. D. Brownell, “Evaluating the impact of menu labeling on food choices and intake,” American Journal of Public Health, vol. 100, no. 2, pp. 312–318, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. A. Flint, A. Raben, J. E. Blundell, and A. Astrup, “Reproducibility, power and validity of visual analogue scales in assessment of appetite sensations in single test meal studies,” International Journal of Obesity, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 38–48, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. R. J. Stubbs, D. A. Hughes, A. M. Johnstone et al., “The use of visual analogue scales to assess motivation to eat in human subjects: a review of their reliability and validity with an evaluation of new hand-held computerized systems for temporal tracking of appetite ratings,” The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 84, no. 4, pp. 405–415, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. P. E. Morris and C. O. Fritz, “Effect sizes in memory research,” Memory, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 832–842, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  39. J. E. Blundell, G. Finlayson, C. Gibbons, P. Caudwell, and M. Hopkins, “The biology of appetite control: do resting metabolic rate and fat-free mass drive energy intake?” Physiology & Behavior, vol. 152, pp. 473–478, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  40. L. Balaguera-Cortes, K. E. Wallman, T. J. Fairchild, and K. J. Guelfi, “Energy intake and appetite-related hormones following acute aerobic and resistance exercise,” Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 958–966, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. S. C. Wooley, “Physiologic versus cognitive factors in short term food regulation in the obese and nonobese,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 62–68, 1972. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. D. Bowen, P. Green, N. Vizenor, C. Vu, P. Kreuter, and B. Rolls, “Effects of fat content on fat hedonics: cognition or taste?” Physiology and Behavior, vol. 78, no. 2, pp. 247–253, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. K. Gravel, É. Doucet, C. P. Herman et al., “‘Healthy,’ ‘diet,’ or ‘hedonic’. How nutrition claims affect food-related perceptions and intake?” Appetite, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 877–884, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  44. M. E. Oakes, “Stereotypical thinking about foods and perceived capacity to promote weight gain,” Appetite, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 317–324, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  45. N. J. Buckland, G. Finlayson, and M. M. Hetherington, “Slimming starters. Intake of a diet-congruent food reduces meal intake in active dieters,” Appetite, vol. 71, pp. 430–437, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  46. V. Provencher and R. Jacob, “Impact of perceived healthiness of food on food choices and intake,” Current Obesity Reports, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 65–71, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  47. J. Cohen, “Statistical power analysis,” Current Directions in Psychological Science, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 98–101, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar