Journal of Obesity

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Age-Related Metabolic Syndrome


Publishing date
01 Apr 2022
Status
Closed
Submission deadline
26 Nov 2021

1Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, UK

2Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital, Liverpool, UK

3Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK

4Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Age-Related Metabolic Syndrome

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Description

The term “cardiometabolic risk” often indicates the existence of the elements of metabolic syndrome (MetS), namely, central obesity, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia, or (more recently) the existence of markers predicting the onset of metabolic syndrome. While in some Western countries the MetS prevalence is reported to be around 20% in adult populations, this increases to over 50% in both men and women over the age of 60 years, pointing to the strong association between ageing and the pathophysiology of the syndrome.

There is convincing evidence that patients with MetS have a two- to threefold higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a fivefold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with the healthy population. This not only significantly contributes to the addition of new cases to more than 422 million and 230 million patients living with CVD and DM respectively across the globe, but also aggravates the burden of these diseases, exacerbates the macro and microvascular complications and the associated disabilities and premature mortality. The rising prevalence of obesity and its associated non-communicable diseases is largely related to lifestyle-related factors such as poor diet and physical inactivity, and the WHO estimates that improving lifestyle would support weight management and reduce the risk of cardiometabolic diseases by 80%, to promote healthier ageing.

This Special Issue aims to expand knowledge on healthy ageing with a special focus on the role of nutrition and physical activity in the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome in older adults. This Issue welcomes the submission of original research and review articles, systematic reviews and metanalyses providing insights on the role of nutrition and physical activity in the prevention and management of age-related cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in older adults.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Association between the dietary patterns and cardiometabolic health in older adults
  • Clinical trials investigating the integrated role of lifestyle and medical interventions for the management of metabolic syndrome in older adults
  • Investigation of the effect of nutritional interventions in the prevention and management of cardiometabolic risk amongst older adults
  • Systematic reviews examining the effect of lifestyle interventions in cardiometabolic risk management in ageing
  • The effect of nutritional supplementation alone and combined with exercise on cardiometabolic health in older adults
  • Systematic reviews investigating the efficacy of different exercise interventions for cardiac rehabilitation in older adults
  • Influence of age-related psychosocial and behavioral changes on nutritional status and lifestyle behaviors in relation to metabolic syndrome
  • Age-related endocrinological changes and metabolic syndrome
  • Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome
Journal of Obesity
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Acceptance rate14%
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CiteScore5.100
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.