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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2010, Article ID 280396, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/280396
Case Report

Ocular Involvement and Blindness Secondary to Linear IgA Dermatosis

1Department of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, Institute of Ophthalmology “Conde de Valenciana”, 06800 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
2Department of Dermatology, Institute of Ophthalmology “Conde de Valenciana”, 06800 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
3Department of Pathology, Institute of Ophthalmology “Conde de Valenciana”, 06800 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
4Department of Immunology and Research Unit, Institute of Ophthalmology “Conde de Valenciana”, 06800 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
5Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, UNAM, 04510 Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Received 19 August 2010; Revised 5 November 2010; Accepted 23 November 2010

Academic Editor: David A. Wilkie

Copyright © 2010 Cinthya Ramos-Castellón et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A 43-year-old man with linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) dermatosis associated with gluten intolerance presented with progressive vision loss, pain and photosensitivity in both eyes. His visual acuity was light perception (LP) in both eyes. A physical examination revealed bullous, papular lesions with erythematous borders in periocular tissues, limbs, and thorax. Slit-lamp examination showed conjunctival hyperemia, fibrosis, corneal opacification, and vascularization with epithelial defects. Immunofluorescent skin and corneal surface biopsy studies showed linear IgA deposits. The patient was treated with keratolimbal allogenic transplantation and cryopreserved amniotic membrane in the right eye. Regardless of the treatment he persisted with torpid evolution developing retinal and choroidal detachments. After these events he was started on intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) and showed very slight improvement in ocular surface. These types of blistering diseases are rare in the eye. Even when adequate local treatment is given, systemic treatment is mandatory and ocular prognosis can be unsatisfactory.