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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 183924, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/183924
Research Article

Inhibition of Return in Fear of Spiders: Discrepant Eye Movement and Reaction Time Data

Department of Psychology, Clinical and Biological Psychology and Psychotherapy, School of Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, L13, 15-17, 68131 Mannheim, Germany

Received 11 November 2013; Accepted 12 May 2014; Published 3 July 2014

Academic Editor: Gernot Horstmann

Copyright © 2014 Elisa Berdica et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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