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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014, Article ID 238939, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/238939
Research Article

Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

1UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB No. 7590, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7590, USA
2Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA
4Health Services Research and Development, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
5Glaucoma Service and Research Center, UNC Kittner Eye Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
6Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
7Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA
8Department of Science and Mathematics, Institutional Research, Husson University, Bangor, ME 04401, USA
9Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21209, USA
10Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21209, USA

Received 29 December 2013; Revised 4 March 2014; Accepted 6 April 2014; Published 24 April 2014

Academic Editor: David J. Calkins

Copyright © 2014 Betsy Sleath et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.