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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014, Article ID 850606, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/850606
Research Article

The Influence of Attention and Target Identification on Saccadic Eye Movements Depends on Prior Target Location

Behavioural Basis of Health, Griffith Health Institute, and School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, QLD 4122, Australia

Received 11 October 2013; Revised 17 December 2013; Accepted 6 January 2014; Published 27 February 2014

Academic Editor: Arvid Herwig

Copyright © 2014 David R. Hardwick et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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