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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 860493, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/860493
Research Article

Selective Age Effects on Visual Attention and Motor Attention during a Cued Saccade Task

Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, PT-PAV 350, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413, USA

Received 6 December 2013; Revised 19 March 2014; Accepted 22 April 2014; Published 12 May 2014

Academic Editor: Stefanie I. Becker

Copyright © 2014 Wendy E. Huddleston et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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