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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2015, Article ID 201726, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/201726
Review Article

Gene Therapy with Endogenous Inhibitors of Angiogenesis for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Beyond Anti-VEGF Therapy

1Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences, University of Melbourne, 4th Floor, Alice Hoy Building, 162 Monash Road, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2Centre for Eye Research Australia, Level 1, 32 Gisborne Street, East Melbourne, VIC 3002, Australia
3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Melbourne, Level 1, 32 Gisborne Street, East Melbourne, VIC 3002, Australia

Received 12 June 2014; Accepted 8 September 2014

Academic Editor: Petros E. Carvounis

Copyright © 2015 Selwyn M. Prea et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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