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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1320457, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1320457
Research Article

A Possible Regression Equation for Predicting Visual Outcomes after Surgical Repair of Open Globe Injuries

1Department of Ophthalmology, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Eskisehir, Turkey
2Department of Biostatistics, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Eskisehir, Turkey

Correspondence should be addressed to Huseyin Gursoy; moc.liamtoh@yosrughh

Received 21 September 2016; Revised 10 December 2016; Accepted 25 December 2016; Published 12 January 2017

Academic Editor: Van C. Lansingh

Copyright © 2017 Huseyin Gursoy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. To analyze the effects of factors other than the ocular trauma score parameters on visual outcomes in open globe injuries. Methods. Open globe injuries primarily repaired in our hospital were reviewed. The number of surgeries, performance of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV), lens status, affected tissues (corneal, scleral, or corneoscleral), intravitreal hemorrhage, intraocular foreign body, glaucoma, anterior segment inflammation, loss of iris tissue, cutting of any prolapsed vitreous in the primary surgery, penetrating injury, and the time interval between the trauma and repair were the thirteen variables evaluated using linear regression analysis. Results. In total, 131 eyes with a mean follow-up of (12–36) months and a mean age of (4–88) years were included. The regression coefficients were 0.502, 0.960, 0.831, −0.385, and −0.506 for the performance of PPV, aphakia after the initial trauma, loss of iris tissue, penetrating injury, and cutting of any prolapsed vitreous in the primary surgery, respectively ( for these variables). Conclusions. The performance of PPV, aphakia after the initial trauma, and loss of iris tissue were associated with poor visual outcomes, whereas cutting any prolapsed vitreous in the primary repair and penetrating-type injury were associated with better visual outcomes.