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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2017, Article ID 5131764, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5131764
Research Article

Influence of Tear Protein Deposition on the Oxygen Permeability of Soft Contact Lenses

Department of Optometry, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 01811, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Mijung Park; rk.ca.hcetluoes@krapjm

Received 1 September 2016; Revised 19 December 2016; Accepted 29 December 2016; Published 9 February 2017

Academic Editor: Antonio Queiros

Copyright © 2017 Se Eun Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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