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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2017, Article ID 6804853, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6804853
Research Article

Regulation of Reentrainment Function Is Dependent on a Certain Minimal Number of Intact Functional ipRGCs in rd Mice

1Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences Key Laboratory, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
2Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences Key Laboratory, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ningli Wang; moc.361.piv@ilgninw

Received 8 June 2017; Accepted 10 October 2017; Published 22 November 2017

Academic Editor: Ji-jing Pang

Copyright © 2017 Jingxue Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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