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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8543592, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8543592
Review Article

Rho-Kinase/ROCK as a Potential Drug Target for Vitreoretinal Diseases

Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Shintaro Nakao; pj.ca.u-uhsuyk.dem@oakans

Received 3 February 2017; Accepted 18 April 2017; Published 17 May 2017

Academic Editor: Naoshi Kondo

Copyright © 2017 Muneo Yamaguchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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