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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2018, Article ID 8965709, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8965709
Research Article

Combined Application of Bevacizumab and Mitomycin C or Bevacizumab and 5-Fluorouracil in Experimental Glaucoma Filtration Surgery

1Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Fourth People’s Hospital, Shanghai 200081, China
2Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200080, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xun Xu; nc.ude.utjs@nuxuxrd

Received 21 March 2018; Revised 23 June 2018; Accepted 15 July 2018; Published 9 September 2018

Academic Editor: Ozlem G. Koz

Copyright © 2018 Lei Zuo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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