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Journal of Osteoporosis
Volume 2011, Article ID 102686, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/102686
Research Article

The Oslo Health Study: A Dietary Index Estimating Frequent Intake of Soft Drinks and Rare Intake of Fruit and Vegetables Is Negatively Associated with Bone Mineral Density

1Section of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1130, Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway
2Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway

Received 17 February 2011; Accepted 5 May 2011

Academic Editor: Harri Sievänen

Copyright © 2011 Arne Torbjørn Høstmark et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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