Journal of Pregnancy
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Outcomes following Placement and Removal of Transvaginal Cerclage in at Risk Pregnancies: A Single Center Experience

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 Journal profile

Journal of Pregnancy publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to all aspects of pregnancy and childbirth. Topics include biomedical aspects of pregnancy labour, maternal health and breastfeeding.

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Journal of Pregnancy maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Associated Factors of Male Participation in Antenatal Care in Muaro Jambi District, Indonesia

Objective. This study aims to evaluate the level of male participation and factors associated with male participation in antenatal care. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed, involving a survey of 381 men, selected through multistage random sampling. The outcome variable male participation in antenatal care was constructed from eight dichotomized indicators, and measurement results were low (scored 1 and 2) and high (scored 3 and 4). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed using SPSS 24.0 at a significance level of 0.05. Results. The percentage of male participation in antenatal care was low (41.2%). Associated factors included age (, ), number of children (, ), income (, ), and knowledge (, ). Knowledge was found to be the main factor for male participation in antenatal care in Muaro Jambi Regency. Conclusion. Male participation in antenatal care in Muaro Jambi District was low and was influenced by age, number of children, income, and knowledge. Health promotion programs are needed to empower men to participate in antenatal care by providing communication, education, and information.

Research Article

COVID-19 and Decision-Making for Pregnant Women: Taking or Relinquishing Control in Response to a Pandemic

COVID-19 has uniquely impacted pregnant women. From the initial unknowns about its virulence during pregnancy, to frequent and rapidly changing hospital guidelines for prenatal care and delivery, pregnant women have felt intense uncertainty and, based on recent research, increased anxiety. This study sought to determine the impact COVID-19 had on women’s birth plans. Open-ended qualitative responses from an anonymous, online survey of pregnant women in the United States, conducted on April 3-24, 2020, were analyzed using the Attride-Stirling qualitative framework. A conceptual framework for understanding the impact of COVID-19 on women’s birth plans was generated. 2,320 pregnant women (mean age 32.7 years, mean weeks pregnant 24.6 weeks) responded to the open-ended prompts, reflecting the following themes: the impact(s) of COVID-19 on pregnant women (including unanticipated changes and uncertainty), the effect of COVID-19 on decision-making (including emotional reactions and subsequent questioning of the healthcare system), and how both of those things led women to either exercise or relinquish their agency related to their birth plan. These findings indicate that the changes and uncertainty surrounding COVID-19 are causing significant challenges for pregnant women, and absent more clarity and more provider-driven support, women seeking to cope are considering changes to their birth plans. Health systems and providers should heed this warning and work to provide pregnant women and their families with more information, support, and collaborative planning to ensure a positive, healthy birth experience, even during a pandemic.

Research Article

Red Light Mitigates the Deteriorating Placental Extracellular Matrix in Late Onset of Preeclampsia and Improves the Trophoblast Behavior

Preeclampsia is a serious pregnancy disorder which in extreme cases may lead to maternal and fetal injury or death. Preexisting conditions which increase oxidative stress, e.g., hypertension and diabetes, increase the mother’s risk to develop preeclampsia. Previously, we established that when the extracellular matrix is exposed to oxidative stress, trophoblast function is impaired, and this may lead to improper placentation. We investigated how the oxidative ECM present in preeclampsia alters the behavior of first trimester extravillous trophoblasts. We demonstrate elevated levels of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and lipid oxidation end product 4-hydroxynonenal in preeclamptic ECM (28%, and 32% increase vs control, respectively) accompanied with 35% and 82% more 3-chlorotyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine vs control, respectively. Furthermore, we hypothesized that 670 nm phototherapy, which has antioxidant properties, reverses the observed trophoblast dysfunction as depicted in the improved migration and reduction in apoptosis. Since NO is critical for placentation, we examined eNOS activity in preeclamptic placentas compared to healthy ones and found no differences; however, 670 nm light treatment triggered enhanced NO availability presumably by using alternative NO sources. Light exposure decreased apoptosis and restored trophoblast migration to levels in trophoblasts cultured on preeclamptic ECM. Moreover, 670 nm irradiation restored expression of Transforming Growth Factor (TGFβ) and Placental Growth Factor (PLGF) to levels observed in trophoblasts cultured on healthy placental ECM. We conclude the application of 670 nm light can successfully mitigate the damaged placental microenvironment of late onset preeclampsia as depicted by the restored trophoblast behavior.

Research Article

Facilitators, Barriers, and Structural Determinants of Physical Activity in Nulliparous Pregnant Women: A Qualitative Study

Aims & Backgrounds. Reduced physical activity in pregnant women is highly stemmed from their misconceptions and attitudes during pregnancy. This study is aimed at recognizing the facilitators, barriers, and structural factors that influence activity among pregnant women. Participants & Methods. This qualitative study was conducted from January to June 2020 in nulliparous pregnant women. Forty participants selected randomly from the Pounak Health Center of Tehran City, Iran, answered open-ended questions about the obstacles that deprived them of physical activity during pregnancy. Data were analyzed by MAXQDA 12 software. Findings. 620 primary codes, 42 secondary codes, 11 subthemes, and 6 themes were extracted. These themes were divided into the PEN-3 categories: facilitators, barriers, and structural factors. The nurture factors as facilitators had communication and support from others as subthemes. Barriers consisted of sociocultural (participate in pregnancy class with a companion, social beliefs, and culture of poverty), socioeconomic (financial problems), and individual factors (physical, psychoemotional, and spiritual dimensions), and structural factors consisted of environmental (equipment) and organizational (possibilities in health centers) factors. Conclusion. Lack of awareness and misinformation, accessibility obstacles, and economic problems are the worst physical activity barriers during pregnancy. Being among other pregnant women and the physicians’ recommendations are the best facilitators of physical activity during pregnancy.

Research Article

Effectiveness of Different Algorithms and Cut-off Value in Preeclampsia First Trimester Screening

Objectives and methods. The first aim of our study was to assess the detectability of women at risk of developing eo-PE depending on the algorithm used. All 801 patients had an estimated risk of eo-PE based on the Fetal Medicine Foundation algorithm. The patients were divided into four groups based on a risk calculation algorithm: 1) screening based on UtPI, MAP, and PlGF; 2) screening based on UtPI, MAP, PAPP-A, and PlGF; 3) screening based on UtPI, MAP, and PAPP-A; and 4) screening based on UtPI and MAP. The second aim was to explore how these groups changed depending on the cut-off points for the increased risk of eo-PE. We selected patients within groups where the risk of eo-PE was >1 : 150. Among them, the UtPI, MAP, PAPP-A, and PLGF values were compared taking into account the sizes of the groups. Results. For the cut-off point >1 : 150, 86 women at an increased risk of eo-PE using algorithm 1 were identified. Of these 86 patients, 83 (96%) were identified using algorithm 2, 62 (72%) using algorithm 3, and 60 (69%) using algorithm 4. In addition, it was demonstrated that between 21% and 29% of women at a low risk of eo-PE could be given acetylsalicylic acid if a screening test was used that did not account for PlGF. Conclusions. In order to provide the highest level of health care to pregnant women, it is extremely important that full screening for eo-PE should be ensured. The cheapest algorithm based only on MAP and UtPI resulted in our patients being unnecessarily exposed to complications.

Research Article

Maternity Continuum Care Completion and Its Associated Factors in Northwest Ethiopia

Background. Continuum care is a basic package approach for women to receive essential services throughout pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum, and it is critical for women and their infants’ survival and well-being. Although it is an effective strategy for improving maternal and child health, it has not been implemented adequately in less developed countries, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia, where 55% of women have been dropped out from the continuum of care. Therefore, this study is aimed at assessing maternity continuum care completion and its associated factors within northwest Ethiopia, 2020. Materials and Methods. A community-based cross-sectional study design was considered among 504 women from March 10 to March 30, 2020, using pretested and structured questionnaires administered via face-to-face interviews. To select study participants, a simple random sampling technique was used. Data were coded, checked, and entered into EpiData software (V. 4.2), then transferred to SPSS (V. 25) for further analysis. A bivariable analysis with 95% CI was performed, and variables with 0.25 during binary logistic regression were entered into a multivariable analysis to assess predictors’ independent effect. Results. About 177 (37.6%) women completed maternal continuum care. Women with secondary education and above (, 95% CI 1.42-5.32), urban residence (, 95% CI 1.35-4.45), using ambulance transport (, 95% CI 2.19-7.19), mass media exposure (, 95% CI 2.02-6.56), and distance from health facilities (, 95% CI 1.84-5.63) showed significant positive associations with completion of maternity continuum care. Conclusion. However, a higher proportion of mothers completed the continuum of maternity care in the district than Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey 2016 (9.1%); further interventions are compulsory to reach the acceptable level. Hence, comprehensive awareness-raising, education, and promotion activities at the community and health facility levels and empowering women in health care and decision-making backing to expand the completion of maternity continuum of care are necessary.

Journal of Pregnancy
 Journal metrics
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Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision-
Acceptance to publication-
CiteScore4.600
Journal Citation Indicator0.870
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.