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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1630967, 6 pages
Clinical Study

Mode of Delivery in Drug-Dependent Pregnant Women: A Case Control Study

Department of Obstetrics B, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to Ana Raquel Neves

Received 16 August 2016; Revised 21 January 2017; Accepted 1 February 2017; Published 26 February 2017

Academic Editor: Jeffrey Keelan

Copyright © 2017 Ana Raquel Neves et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Objective. To determine the contribution of drug use during pregnancy to the route of delivery. Methods. A case-control study was conducted at a hospital in Coimbra, Portugal, between 2001 and 2014. Drug-dependent pregnant women () were compared with a control group of low risk women () in terms of maternal characteristics, obstetric history, pregnancy complications, and labor details. Factors that influenced the mode of delivery were determined. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS v. 23.0 (IBM Corp.). p values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results. Drug-dependent women presented a lower rate of cesarean delivery (18.2 versus 28.9%, ). After adjusting for the factors that were significantly related to the mode of delivery, drug dependency influenced the rate of cesarean section (; 95% CI = 0.328–0.980). Within the drug-dependent group, the mode of delivery was significantly related to previous cesarean or vaginal delivery ( and , resp.) and fetal presentation (), but not with the type of drug, route of administration, or substitution maintenance therapy. Conclusions. The drug-dependent group presented a significantly higher rate of vaginal delivery. However, this was not associated with the behavioral factors analyzed. We hypothesize that other social and psychological factors might explain this difference.