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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2017, Article ID 4975091, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4975091
Research Article

A Framework for Describing the Influence of Service Organisation and Delivery on Participation in Fetal Anomaly Screening in England

1Department of Public Health, Saudi Electronic University, P.O. Box 93499, Riyadh 11673, Saudi Arabia
2School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Baines Wing, Room 3.10, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
3School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, 2.25 Baines Wing, Leeds LS2 9UT, UK
4Margaret and Wallace McCain Chair in Human Development and Health, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3

Correspondence should be addressed to Hyacinth O. Ukuhor; moc.oohay@0002oocayh

Received 29 August 2016; Revised 14 February 2017; Accepted 22 February 2017; Published 22 March 2017

Academic Editor: Jeffrey Keelan

Copyright © 2017 Hyacinth O. Ukuhor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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